WAR: A word that speaks for itself

corregidor travel plus

A half spread photo and a feature on Corregidor Island.

 

The island is like a re-enactment of that calm-before-the-storm scene from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, before the surprise attack. The winds are quiet, sending gentle waves at the North Dock. The Philippine flag is fluidly dancing through it, enjoying its long lost freedom. The ruins stand dignified under the sun, boasting of its survival all this time. And the cannons are sitting lazily and cozily on the battery concretes.

But all of a sudden, the island is jolted into battle mode, as a ferry filled with tourists docks in the shores of Corregidor. It is as if history, experience and trauma suddenly send a silent air raid alarm, awakening the whole island.

At around past nine o’clock in the morning, the visitors, who seem to be recruits newly introduced to war zone, have already disembarked from the vessel and are gathered around the pre-war tranvias. By this time, Corregidor is now all-prepared to make its transformation and transport these new soldiers back in the time of war.

 

The Viewfinder gets you back in time on her feature on Corregidor Island, which just got published in the pre-holiday issue (Vol. 7 No. 3) of Travel Plus magazine.

Grab your copies now to find out how the island explained the word war to visitors.

Travel Plus magazine is available on all leading bookstores and magazine stands.

And as the soldiers now leave the island, Corregidor can now go back to rest while the tourists bring with them a deeper understanding of the island and this powerful word called war.

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Down the Rabbit Hole of Manila

jellyfish museo pambata

Reaching for the jellyfish. Photo by Nessa Gabrillo.

Since I was a kid, wondering had been my hobby. And finding Lewis Carroll’s wonderland had been one of my dreams. Growing up, I became curiouser and curiouser about that place.

As I traveled around the world, the white rabbit of curiosity lured me to different rabbit holes, like the Hong Kong Disneyland, and the Moment of Imagination and Nostalgia with Toys or the MINT Museum in Singapore.

But I never thought that our beloved Manila could also house such a treat. Magic was overflowing even outside this rabbit hole located at Roxas Boulevard corner South Drive. With P250, I was given a local magic carpet ride back to my childhood days. Boasting its 8 enchanted rooms, Museo Pambata promised to bring me to that one true wonderland.

My Museo Pambata tour published online. Read the full story on Rappler.

Spread the magical love! 🙂

Missing KL and SG

It had been a year now since I took the multi-cultural photographs of Kuala Lumpur and Singapore.

Malaysia National Mosque

Inside the National Mosque of Malaysia.

As I wrote in the Travel section of the 2015 First Quarter issue of The Electrical Engineer magazine:

On the far corners of a photograph are limestone caves beautifully lit by the rising sun. A towering minaret and the statue of Hindu god, Murugan, compete with Petronas over the horizon. An enormous Buddhist temple oversees Chinatown, where the Merlion statue stands proudly. A jam-packed train passes by, filled with Malays, Indians, Chinese and Muslims braving the Kuala Lumpur and Singapore rush hours.

With its wide range of destinations both for the city-dwellers and the nature-trippers, Malaysia and Singapore are few of those nations which can extract the most multi-cultural photographs out of a traveler’s camera.

Get to know these destinations in a free copy of the magazine in this link:

The Electrical Engineer is the official magazine of the Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines, Inc. My article is at page 24.

I also wrote a different story of that trip here at Baggage Counter. 

That night, while roaming around Kuala Lumpur Chinatown searching for good food, I thought I found another Pinoy when someone shouted “Maganda (Beautiful)”. When I looked around, he was an Indian and offered me some Malaysian souvenirs after confirming that I was a Filipina. These Indians sure knew how to make a Pinay smile.

You can read the full blog post in this link.

Enjoy reading! 🙂